Improving the Identification of Undiagnosed Diabetes in Primary Care

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Authors
Hooker, Katherine
Issue Date
2023-05-04
Keywords
Research Subject Categories::INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS::Caring sciences::Nursing , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Prediabetic State , Risk Assessment
Description/Abstract
Background: Over 30 million Americans suffer from diabetes, and over 80 million Americans suffer from prediabetes and is underdiagnosed within the United States. Early identification for diabetes conditions, such as using a risk assessment tool, can reduce the medical cost for patients and practices. This serious, debilitating disease can lead to an increased risk of complications (including stroke, heart disease, kidney failure, foot infection leading to amputation, and even blindness). Purpose: The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to determine if the implementation of a diabetic screening tool known as the American Diabetes Risk Test (ADADRT), in the primary care setting by providers can help providers and patients diagnose diabetes early, and/or prevent it, most importantly. Methods: A quantitative design method utilizing a retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at the practice for the three months before the ADADRT implementation and after to evaluate for both the primary and secondary outcomes of the QI project. Results: An independent sample t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significance between the ADADRT score and if patients should have proper further testing if needed. The result of the two-tailed independent samples t-test was significant based on an alpha value of .05, t(58) = 12.65, p < .001. Another independent sample t-test was performed analyzing if there was a significance between the ADADRT score and actually administering the tool itself. The result of the twotailed independent samples t-test was significant based on an alpha value of .05, t(54.48) = -4.38, p < .001 Recommendations and Conclusion: ADADRT is an effective tool for identification of prediabetes and Type II Diabetes (T2DM) and a valuable resource for providers to incorporate evidence-based treatment plans to prevent or alter the progression of diabetes.
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